The Flying Mast

(insane in the membrane...)

So long Giant Marshmallow

The Iconic inflatable roof of the BC Place Stadium in Vancouver, Canada – aka the “giant marshmallow” – was finally deflated last may.

(Credit: John Bollwitt via Flickr)

(Credit: maplemusketeer via Flickr)

The existing pneumatic dome is to be dismantled and replaced with a partially fixed, partially retractable fabric roof as well as a transparent membrane façade.

When completed, this roof will be the largest cable-supported retractable roof in the world. The projected area of the retractable portion of the roof is approximately 6,700m², requiring a total of approximately 13,400m² of membrane material.

The project’s estimated budget is $458 million, and it is scheduled for completion by summer 2011.

The  new roof would cut energy costs at the stadium by one quarter, or about $350,000 per year.

A model of the new roof:

(Credit: Michael Kwan (Freelancer) via Flickr)

The project was designed by Stantec Architects Ltd, with structural engineering being provided by Geiger Engineers, New York, USA and Schlaich Bergermann & Partners, Stuttgart, Germany, supported by specialist consultants from Tensys.

The entire retractable roof and the fixed façade for the stadium is supplied by the Hightex GmbH in Germany – a world leader in the design and construction of retractable roof systems.

The fixed roof will be completed by FabriTec Structures, a brand of USA Shade & Fabric Structures – an award-winning full service
design/build organization specializing in tensile membrane structures.

From Hightex’s web site:

The contract will involve the fabrication and installation of the complete retractable portion of the membrane roof system in Tenara membrane, a woven, high translucency PTFE fabric, as well as the façade system to be fabricated from a transparent membrane with a light-controlling frit pattern. The design work will commence immediately, with completion planned to take place in mid 2011.

[…]

The new roof substructure consists of radial cable net and outer steel columns. The fabric roof is divided up into 36 fixed outer panels and 36 inner retractable segments. The outer fixed roof, to be the subject of a separate contract, has an area of about 34,000m². The inner roof will consist of a double layer Tenara membrane with an inflated inter-space to form “cushion” elements.

The cushions will be pre-stressed using hydraulic tensioning units and inflation via fan units. The retractable roof will be connected to the 36 radial cables by specially designed sliding and driving carriages. The deflated cushion will be stored at the centre of the roof in a membrane garage. To close the roof, the driving carriages will pull the membrane outwards radially towards the perimeter. The retractable roof is made of a highly translucent fabric which will allow the fabric to be folded without damage.

The new façade comprises some 6,000m² of transparent membrane panels using ETFE. The facade panels are pre-stressed using metal arches and are attached directly to the primary steel structure.

The deflation of the BC stadium – Time Lapse:

The deflation seen from the inside:

(Credit: miss604 via Flickr)

(Credit: miss604 via Flickr)

(Credit: miss604 via Flickr)

(Credit: miss604 via Flickr)

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October 20, 2010 - 4:00 PM Comments: Closed

Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in Port Elizabeth

(Credit: ChuckAitch (Charles Heiman - iMedi8 Photographic) via Flickr)

This is the third Stadium designed by the Berlin-based firm GMP Architekten for the 2010 FIFa World Cup in South Africa. The other two venues are the Moses Mabhida Stadium and the Greenpoint Stadium.

(Credit: ChuckAitch (Charles Heiman - iMedi8 Photographic) via Flickr)

The Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium is located in Port Elizabeth next to North End Lake in the middle of Prince Alfred’s Park, and was designed as a football and rugby stadium. The stadium can seat 48,000 spectators and during the World Cup it will host eight games, including the 3rd and 4th place match.

(Credit: nedend via Flickr)

The roof structure protects spectators against the sun and frequent, violent onshore winds, and features approximately 21,300 m2 of PTFE coated fiberglass membrane arranged in 36 leaf-shaped components that completely wrap the stadium. 2,400 metric tons of roof girders were used to form the roof design. The valleys formed by the roof’s cable system will help drain rainwater. The cantilever tresses that support the edges of each fabric panel are clad in aluminum.

(Credit: smee.bruce via Flickr)

The construction of the Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium aims to revitalize the whole urban area of Port Elizabeth, and is designed to become, after the games, a water based recreational area and offer a high-quality modern facility for the local sport clubs.

(Credit: Direkteur Begeleiding via Flickr)

For more info on The Nelson Mandela Bay Stadium in Port Elizabeth see also:

dezeen.com

archdaily.com

Other related posts on this blog:

The World Cup stadiums in South Africa

The Moses Mabhida Stadium

The Greenpoint Stadium

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June 16, 2010 - 4:54 PM Comments: Closed