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The Moses Mabhida Stadium

(Credit: David J. Roberts via Flickr)

The Moses Mabhida stadium – named after the former general secretary of the South African Communist Party – is one of the three stadiums designed by the German firm GMP Architekten for the 2010 FIFA World Cup.

This project group consisted of a total of 32 South African architectural firms plus GMP Architekten as consultant architects and Schlaich Bergermann und Partner as conceptual structural engineers.

(Credit: Sir. Mo via Flickr)

The Moses Mabhida Stadium is situated on an elevated platform in the central sports park on the shore of the Indian Ocean, and is accessed from the city and station via a broad flight of steps.

(Credit: Sir. Mo via Flickr)

The construction was finished in 2009 and some matches have been already held in this venue. The Moses Mabhida Stadium has a capacity to seat 70,000, and will host one of the FIFA 2010 World Cup semi-final matches. After the games, the number will be reduced to 56,000, but can be temporarily increased to as many as 85,000 for major events.

(Credit: David J. Roberts via Flickr)

The project features a 105m arch that rises high over the stadium, and is destined to become an architectural icon and city landmark in Durban’s skyline.

(Credit: Sir. Mo via Flickr)

The 350m long free-span steel arch weighs 2600 tons, and carries the weight of the inner membrane roof with 95mm-diameter steel cables.

(Credit: ¡Fgz! via Flickr)

(Credit: ChameleonGreen via Flickr)

The unusual geometry of the cable system is derived logically from the structure.

Radial prestressing cables are attached to the external edge of the roof all round the stadium and the great arch on one side and the inner edge of the roof on the other, thus forcing the latter into an almond shape.

The bifurcation of the huge arch at the south end forms the main entrance of the stadium. At the northern end, a cable car transports visitors to the ‘Skydeck’ at the apex of the arch to get a panoramic view of the city and the Indian Ocean.

(Credit: ChameleonGreen via Flickr)

The 46,000m2 PTFE-coated roof membrane admits 50% of the sunlight into the arena while also providing shade and shelter from rain to 80% of the stadium.

(Credit: Marc Forrest via Flickr)

By night the roof surfaces is illuminated on top by a line of LEDs mounted directly on the arch and from below by floodlights installed on the catwalk, resulting in a spectacular view.

(Credit: nozoomii via Flickr)

The compression ring and façade are carried on precast concrete columns below and hollow box steel columns above, the height and angle of inclination varying around the stadium from approx. 30m with a 90° inclination to about 50m with a 60° inclination.

(Credit: YattaCat via Flickr)

The façade is covered with perforated metal sheeting which give the stadium a light and airy feel. This solution provides shelter from rain and strong winds while allowing in natural light and ventilation.

For more info on The Moses Mabhida Stadium see also:

dezeen.com

designboom.com

archdaily.com

inhabitat.com

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June 12, 2010 - 9:30 AM